’Mozart effect’: can classical music really make your child smarter?

Baby and music 2The ‘Mozart effect’ was first suggested by a scientific study published in 1993 in the respected journal Science.
It showed that teenagers who listened to Mozart’s 1781 Sonata for Two Pianos in D major performed better in reasoning tests than students who listened to something else or who had been in a silent room.
The study found that college students who listened to a Mozart sonata for a few minutes before taking a test that measured spatial relationship skills did better than students who took the test after listening to another musician or no music at all.
Lubetzky’s team said it was possible that the proposed Mozart effect on the brain is related to the structure of his compositions as Mozart’s music tends to repeat the melodic line more frequently.
Music seems to prime our brains for certain kinds of thinking. After listening to classical music, adults can do certain spatial tasks more quickly, such as putting together a jigsaw puzzle. The classical music pathways in our brain are similar to the pathways we use for spatial reasoning. When we listen to classical music, the spatial pathways are “turned on” and ready to be used.
Learning to play an instrument can have longer-lasting effects on spatial reasoning, however. In several studies, children who took piano lessons for six months improved their ability to work puzzles and solve other spatial tasks by as much as 30 percent.

At Sally Piano Music we help our students develop their music skills and characters .

 

Why classical Music?
The music most people call “classical”–works by composers such as Bach, Beethoven, or Mozart–is different from music such as rock and country. Classical music has a more complex musical structure. Babies as young as 3 months can pick out that structure and even recognize classical music selections they have heard before.
Researchers think the complexity of classical music is what primes the brain to solve spatial problems more quickly. So listening to classical music may have different effects on the brain than listening to other types of music.
This doesn’t mean that other types of music aren’t good. Listening to any kind of music helps build music-related pathways in the brain. And music can have positive effects on our moods that may make learning easier.